Does your website strategy accelerate growth? The success of your business depends on a winning plan. With the website as the center of your business foundation, as well as marketing, customer support, employees, business partners, sales, business partners, and PR. Here are the 7 elements of an Effective Website Strategy.

The first element of an effective website strategy is to know …

1. What are Your Organizational Goals?

The objective is to grow online sales by 25% over the next 12  months without an increase in ad spending.

Your Business Strategy Might Be To …

  • Enhance SEO efforts to Drive incremental free traffic.
  • Refine paid search campaigns to drive higher volumes of qualified traffic at the same or lower CPC.
  • Redesign selected areas to increase conversion rate on direct, organics, and partner traffic.
  • Develop custom landing pages for each primary target audience AND product to increase conversion rate on a banner, email, and paid search traffic.

2. What is Your Website Strategy?

Treat Your Website Like a Business

The second element of an effective website strategy is to Spell out your Website Game Plan. What are your Objectives? What are you trying to accomplish?

Bad answer – “My website is brochureware. A place for people to see what we do. ”
Bad Answer – “I just want a basic website.”

Does your Website Game Plan support your organizational goals?

Be mindful of website usability and design

from your client’s perspective. How can we use the website to achieve organizational objectives?

Possible organizational website objectives

  • Good: Increase sales. Better: Perform Keyword Research

    to gain insight into how buyers are searching for our products online.

  • Good: Drive more traffic to our website. Better: Enhance SEO efforts

    to Drive incremental free traffic.

  • Good: Generate leads. Better: Refine paid search campaigns to drive higher volumes of qualified traffic at the same or lower CPC.
  • Better: Redesign selected areas to increase conversion rate on direct, organic, and partner traffic.
  • Develop custom landing pages for each primary target audience AND product to increase conversion rate on a banner, email and paid search traffic.
  • Good: Reduce support costs
  • Good: Foster loyalty among customers
  • Good: Streamline processes

3. Know Your Target Audience

The third element of an effective website strategy is to know Who’s your target audience and what behavior changes would you like them to adopt? You may be a company that sells renewable energy product(s). Who are the individuals or groups of community members that your program needs to influence?

Categorize your audiences, select behavior changes, segment your primary audience and understand motives for and barriers to participation.

The three categories of target audiences are primary, influencers, and gatekeepers.

Then identify the specific behavior you wish to change in each audience type: What is it that you want each audience to do differently as a result of your messaging?

Segment your primary audience because certain subsets are more inclined to participate in your program or complete the desired behavior than others. For example, it may be useful to break down your primary audience (e.g., single-family homeowners) based on characteristics such as income, age, or language spoken in the home, or perhaps attitudes, beliefs, and values. Then prioritize for those people whom you want to quickly act on your messages and participate in your program.

4. Your prospects and customers expect Credibility

The fourth element of an effective website strategy is to build credibility and trust. What do customers say about your product or service? Are there any deals and special offers available? Can they talk to a live person? How do they get started?

5. Prioritize Design Efforts

The fifth element of an effective website strategy is to know, as the image above shows, common design priorities are often the Home Page first, then Category pages, Forms, with Landing Pages as a last thought.

The winning website design effort for better lead generating, higher-converting websites lies in placing the most efforts in what makes the cash register ring! The checkout page. Actually, it’s the confirmation page that ensures the purchase. You get the idea. Please note that the checkout page is most important in eCommerce sites. For industries that don’t sell products online, the landing page is the top priority.

The Landing Page

landing page is a page on your site that is designed to convert visitors into leads. It is different from other pages on your website in that it follows both of these criteria: It has a form that allows you to capture a visitor’s information in exchange for the desired offer.

Place time, money, and effort on each landing page for a winning website design. One landing page for every product you sell. Additionally, one Landing page for every service you sell. Tap here for details of the Ingredients of what makes a successful Landing Page.

The Detail Page

A product detail page is a web page that provides information on a specific product. A good product page includes a descriptive product name, has quality images with the option to enlarge the view, offer clear product options, such as color or quantity, size, color, price, shipping information, reviews, and an easy way to select options, and show product availability. Don’t forget to tell them how they can purchase the product from you.

The Category Page

The Category page is basically the bridge between your homepage and your product pages. After your homepage, the category page is the next most important step in your funnel. This is the part where you help narrow down options for people and guide them to their desired product page so they make a purchase.

The Home Page

The home page is the table of contents of your website. It tells the entire story of your business and all the solutions your business provides. There’s so much information here. That’s why it’s important that all your advertising that directs traffic to your website should NOT be directed to the home page. Each of your paid ads goes to the landing page that speaks to one particular product. Otherwise, it is too confusing for the visitor.

6. Measure the Right Metrics

The sixth element of an effective website strategy is to know the

5 Metrics That DON”T Matter

  1. Traffic.
  2. Time on Site
  3. Average Page Views.
  4. Hits.
  5. Surveys.
  6. Focus groups.

12 Metrics That DO Matter

Every Industry has Average Conversion rates.

Business Metrics Site Metrics User Metrics
Revenue Conversion rate User Testing Results
Transactions Most Visited Pages Satisfaction Survey Trends
Profit Time on Site Focus Group Feedback
Gross Margin Traffic Customer Support Inquiries
Site Type Metrics
Selling Products or Services Online Revenue, Profit, Conversion Rate, Average Order Value, Average cost per conversion
Lead Generation Sites Lead Volume, Conversion Rate, Revenue originating from web leads, Cost Per Lead, Revenue Per Visit.
Ad-based content sites Revenue, Profit, Average Page Views Per Visit, Average Cost Per Visit, Average Revenue Per Visit.

 

7. Create, Measure, Learn

The seventh element of an effective website strategy is to know that Your website is never “done”. Think of it as a long term initiative. Technology is always changing. Competitive environments always changing. User expectations are continuously evolving.

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